Table of Contents
ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 260847, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/260847
Review Article

Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Patients with Hereditary Cancer Risk within the United States

Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA

Received 6 August 2013; Accepted 19 September 2013

Academic Editors: G. Ferrandina, S. Martino, and M. Santarosa

Copyright © 2013 Deborah Cragun and Tuya Pal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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