Table of Contents
ISRN Allergy
Volume 2013, Article ID 261297, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/261297
Research Article

Ultrastructural Changes of Airway in Murine Models of Allergy and Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome

1Renal Pathology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India
2Molecular Immunogenetics Laboratory and Center for Translational Research in Asthma and Lung Disease, CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi 110007, India

Received 17 June 2013; Accepted 18 July 2013

Academic Editors: S. Burastero, A. Lorentz, and T. Oga

Copyright © 2013 Geeta Devi Leishangthem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Studying ultrastructural changes could reveal novel pathophysiology of obese-asthmatic condition as existing concepts in asthma pathogenesis are based on the histological changes of the diseased airway. While asthma is defined in functional terms, the potential of electron microscopy (EM) in providing cellular and subcellular detail is underutilized. With this view, we have performed transmission EM in the lungs from allergic mice that show key features of asthma and high-fat- or high-fructose-fed mice that mimicked metabolic syndrome to illustrate the ultrastructural changes. The primary focus was epithelial injury and metaplasia, which are cardinal features of asthma and initiate airway remodeling. EM findings of the allergically inflamed mouse lungs correlate with known features of human asthma such as increased mitochondria in airway smooth muscle, platelet activation and subepithelial myofibroblasts. Interestingly, we found a clear and unambiguous evidence to suggest that ciliated cells can become goblet cells using immunoelectron microscopy. Additionally, we show for the first time the stressed mitochondria in the bronchial epithelia of high-fat- or high-fructose-fed mice even without allergen exposure. These results may stimulate interest in using EM in understanding novel pathological mechanisms for different subtypes of asthma including obese asthma.