Table of Contents
ISRN Nephrology
Volume 2013, Article ID 280395, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/280395
Research Article

Vitamin E Is a Nephroprotectant Agent in Male but Not in Female in a Model of Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

1Water & Electrolytes Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745, Iran
2Deparment of Biology, Falavarjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan 84515, Iran
3Department of Physiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745, Iran
4Kidney Diseases Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745, Iran
5Department of Clinical Pathology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745, Iran
6Department of Internal Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745, Iran

Received 14 May 2013; Accepted 9 June 2013

Academic Editors: B. Di Iorio, E. F. Elsayed, C. Fourtounas, and G. Gonlusen

Copyright © 2013 Sima Jilanchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The role of gender for nephroprotectant agent such as vitamin E in cisplatin- (CP-) induced nephrotoxicity has not been documented yet. Methods. One group from each gender of Wistar rats received a single dose of CP (7 mg/kg; i.p) and was treated with vitamin E (1 g/kg/day) for 7 days, and they were compared with similar gender in the control group. Results. The serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in male animals treated with CP was not different from the control group, but it was significantly different in the female rats ( ). The CP-induced damage intensity in male kidney tissue was not significantly different between the CP-treated and control groups, but this was not the case in female, indicating that the tissue damage in female is significantly different from the control group ( ). No significant difference in serum levels of magnesium (Mg), nitrite, malondialdehyde (MDA), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was seen between the genders. Kidney weight and body weight changes were statistically significant in both genders ( ). Significant difference was observed in uterus weight between the two groups of female ( ). Conclusion. Vitamin E may prevent CP-induced nephrotoxicity in male, but possibly it has not such nephroprotectant effect in female.