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International Scholarly Research Notices has retracted this article. The article was found to contain images with signs of duplication and manipulation in Figures 5(a), 5(b), 6(a), and 6(b), and duplication from Talukdar D. Plant Growth and Leaf Antioxidant Metabolism of Four Elite Grass Pea (Lathyrus sativus) Genotypes, Differing in Arsenic Tolerance. Agric Res (2013) 2: 330. doi:10.1007/s40003-013-0085-3 in Figure 6.

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References

  1. D. Talukdar, “Growth responses and leaf antioxidant metabolism of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) genotypes under salinity stress,” ISRN Agronomy, vol. 2013, Article ID 284830, 15 pages, 2013.
ISRN Agronomy
Volume 2013, Article ID 284830, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/284830
Research Article

Growth Responses and Leaf Antioxidant Metabolism of Grass Pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) Genotypes under Salinity Stress

Department of Botany, R.P.M. College, University of Calcutta, Uttarpara, Hooghly, West Bengal 712 258, India

Received 3 September 2013; Accepted 17 November 2013

Academic Editors: A. Berville and F. Volaire

Copyright © 2013 Dibyendu Talukdar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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