Table of Contents
ISRN Geriatrics
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 285860, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/285860
Research Article

The Role of Enactment in Learning American Sign Language in Younger and Older Adults

1McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery and Study (MiNDS), McMaster University, ON, Canada L8S 4L8
2Kinesiology, McMaster University, ON, Canada L8S 4L8

Received 18 August 2012; Accepted 16 September 2012

Academic Editors: K. Furukawa and D. G. Walker

Copyright © 2013 Alison Fenney and Timothy D. Lee. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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