Table of Contents
ISRN Genomics
Volume 2013, Article ID 307608, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/307608
Research Article

Multiscale fragPIN Modularity

1Center for Computational Science (CCS), University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136, USA
2Laboratory for Integrative Systems Medicine (LISM), Institute of Clinical Physiology (IFC), National Research Council (CNR), 56124 Pisa, Italy

Received 12 November 2012; Accepted 3 December 2012

Academic Editors: S. Cavallaro, A. Stubbs, and Z. Zhang

Copyright © 2013 Enrico Capobianco. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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