Table of Contents
ISRN Critical Care
Volume 2013, Article ID 347346, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/347346
Research Article

Comparing Drug-Drug Interaction Severity Ratings between Bedside Clinicians and Proprietary Databases

1Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit and Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
2Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics and Critical Care Medicine, Clinical Translational Science Institute and School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacoinformatics and Outcomes Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
3Department of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
4Medical Intensive Care Unit and Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
5Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
6Surgical Intensive Care Unit and Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA

Received 20 September 2012; Accepted 16 October 2012

Academic Editors: F. Cavaliere, A. M. Japiassu, D. Makris, and A. K. Mankan

Copyright © 2013 Michael J. Armahizer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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