Table of Contents
ISRN Developmental Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 348704, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/348704
Review Article

Gene Networks during Skeletal Myogenesis

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA

Received 19 June 2013; Accepted 19 August 2013

Academic Editors: G. Levi and G. Tettamanti

Copyright © 2013 Diana Eng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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