Table of Contents
ISRN Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 391561, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/391561
Research Article

The Interaction between Base Compositional Heterogeneity and Among-Site Rate Variation in Models of Molecular Evolution

Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, 101 Science Drive, Box 3382, Durham, NC 27708, USA

Received 1 November 2012; Accepted 27 November 2012

Academic Editors: J. Fan, G. Glöckner, and J. A. Norman

Copyright © 2013 Nathan C. Sheffield. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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