Table of Contents
ISRN Neuroscience
Volume 2013, Article ID 413515, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/413515
Clinical Study

Biopsychosocial Aspects of Atypical Odontalgia

1Pain Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Via Roma 67, 56127 Pisa, Italy
2Department of Head and Neck, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Via Roma 67, 56127 Pisa, Italy
3Department of Dentistry, University of Pavia, Via Ferrara 1, 27100 Pavia, Italy

Received 30 December 2012; Accepted 25 January 2013

Academic Editors: A. Almeida, G. Hans, and M. Larysz-Brysz

Copyright © 2013 A. Ciaramella et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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