Table of Contents
ISRN Forestry
Volume 2013, Article ID 457698, 33 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/457698
Review Article

Sustaining Cavity-Using Species: Patterns of Cavity Use and Implications to Forest Management

Forest Sciences Department, University of British Columbia, 3041-2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4

Received 12 September 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editors: F. Castedo-Dorado, T. S. Fredericksen, H. Nahrung, and J. F. Negron

Copyright © 2013 Fred L. Bunnell. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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