Table of Contents
ISRN Dentistry
Volume 2013, Article ID 519421, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/519421
Review Article

Role of Sugar and Sugar Substitutes in Dental Caries: A Review

1Department of Public Health Dentistry, Dasmesh Institute of Research and Dental Sciences, Faridkot, Punjab, India
2Department of Prosthodontics, Dasmesh Institute of Research and Dental Sciences, Faridkot, Punjab 151203, India
3Department of Oral Pathology, Aditya Dental College, Beed, Maharashtra 431122, India
4Department of Oral Pathology, Vishnu Dental College and Hospital, Bhimavaram 534 202, India
5Department of Orthodontics, Dasmesh Institute of Research and Dental Sciences, Faridkot, Punjab, India
6Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Dasmesh Institute of Research and Dental Sciences, Faridkot, Punjab, India

Received 3 September 2013; Accepted 6 November 2013

Academic Editors: M. Behr and G. H. Sperber

Copyright © 2013 Prahlad Gupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Dental caries is a chronic disease which can affect us at any age. The term “caries” denotes both the disease process and its consequences, that is, the damage caused by the disease process. Dental caries has a multifactorial aetiology in which there is interplay of three principal factors: the host (saliva and teeth), the microflora (plaque), and the substrate (diet), and a fourth factor: time. The role of sugar (and other fermentable carbohydrates such as highly refined flour) as a risk factor in the initiation and progression of dental caries is overwhelming. Whether this initial demineralization proceeds to clinically detectable caries or whether the lesion is remineralized by plaque minerals depends on a number of factors, of which the amount and frequency of further sugars consumption are of utmost importance. This paper reviews the role of sugar and sugar substitutes in dental caries.