Table of Contents
ISRN Toxicology
Volume 2013, Article ID 521432, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/521432
Research Article

Influence of Mikania laevigata Extract over the Genotoxicity Induced by Alkylating Agents

1Laboratório de Biologia Celular e Molecular, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Avenida Universitária 1105, Bairro Universitário, 88806-000 Criciúma, SC, Brazil
2Grupo de Estudos Etnofarmacológicos Visando à Obtenção de Substâncias Bioativas, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Avenida Universitária 1105, Bairro Universitário, 88806-000 Criciúma, SC, Brazil

Received 29 December 2012; Accepted 23 January 2013

Academic Editors: F. Ducancel, H. Pan-Hou, and F.-Y. Yu

Copyright © 2013 Daliane Medeiros Mazzorana et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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