Table of Contents
ISRN Nutrition
Volume 2013, Article ID 538427, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/538427
Research Article

Dietary Supplementation of Calendula officinalis Counteracts the Oxidative Stress and Liver Damage Resulted from Aflatoxin

1Pharmacology and Toxicology Department, College of Pharmacy, Misr University for Science and Technology, Al-Motamayez District, P.O. Box 77, 6th October City, Egypt
2Pharmacology and Toxicology Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11787, Egypt
3Pathology Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo 12311, Egypt
4Medical Physiology Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo 12311, Egypt
5Food Toxicology and Contaminants Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo 12311, Egypt

Received 25 November 2012; Accepted 10 January 2013

Academic Editors: M. Holecek, M. G. Nikolaidis, H. Schröder, and C. Shing

Copyright © 2013 Mohamed A. Hamzawy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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