Table of Contents
ISRN Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 539305, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/539305
Research Article

Curcumin Attenuation of Lipopolysaccharide Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Rodents

1College of Veterinary Medicine, Nursing and Allied Health, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088, USA
2Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, School of Pharmacy, Suwanee, GA, USA

Received 11 July 2013; Accepted 4 September 2013

Academic Editors: B. Kim and D. Szukiewicz

Copyright © 2013 Rupak Chowdhury et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. “Surveillance for foodborne disease outbreaks—United States, 2007,” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. 31, pp. 973–979, 2010.
  2. Sitemap-Foodborne Illness: Food Poisoning, OutBreak, Inc., 2005–2013.
  3. T. Matsuguchi, T. Musikacharoen, T. Ogawa, and Y. Yoshikai, “Gene expressions of Toll-like receptor 2, but not Toll-like receptor 4, is induced by LPS and inflammatory cytokines in mouse macrophages,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 165, no. 10, pp. 5767–5772, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. K. Todar, The microbial world [Ph.D. thesis], Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2009.
  5. J. Backs and E. N. Olson, “Control of cardiac growth by histone acetylation/deacetylation,” Circulation Research, vol. 98, no. 1, pp. 15–24, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. L. Clayton, C. A. Hazzalin, and L. C. Mahadevan, “Enhanced histone acetylation and transcription: a dynamic perspective,” Molecular Cell, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 289–296, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. H. M. Chan and N. B. La Thangue, “p300/CBP proteins: HATs for transcriptional bridges and scaffolds,” Journal of Cell Science, vol. 114, no. 13, pp. 2363–2373, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. T. Yanazume, K. Hasegawa, T. Morimoto et al., “Cardiac p300 is involved in myocyte growth with decompensated heart failure,” Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 23, no. 10, pp. 3593–3606, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. H.-L. Li, C. Liu, G. de Couto et al., “Curcumin prevents and reverses murine cardiac hypertrophy,” The Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 118, no. 3, pp. 879–893, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. B. B. Aggarwal, A. Kumar, M. S. Aggarwal, and S. Shishodia, “Curcumin derived from turmeric (Curcuma longa): a spice for all seasons,” in Phytochemicals in Cancer Chemoprevention, pp. 349–387, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla, USA, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  11. J. L. Workman and R. E. Kingston, “Alteration of nucleosome structure as a mechanism of transcriptional regulation,” Annual Review of Biochemistry, vol. 67, pp. 545–579, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. R. Davie and V. A. Spencer, “Control of histone modifications,” Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 75, supplement 32-33, pp. 141–148, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  13. H. Kook, J. J. Lepore, A. D. Gitler et al., “Cardiac hypertrophy and histone deacetylase-dependent transcriptional repression mediated by the atypical homeodomain protein Hop,” The Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 112, no. 6, pp. 863–871, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. L. Glowczewski, J. H. Waterborg, and J. G. Berman, “Yeast chromatin assembly complex 1 protein excludes nonacetylatable forms of histone H4 from chromatin and the nucleus,” Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 24, no. 23, pp. 10180–10192, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. H. Taniura, J. C. G. Sng, and Y. Yoneda, “Histone modifications in status epilepticus induced by kainate,” Histology and Histopathology, vol. 21, no. 7–9, pp. 785–791, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. G. A. Blobel, “CREB-binding protein and p300: molecular integrators of hematopoietic transcription,” Blood, vol. 95, no. 3, pp. 745–755, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. J. C. Chrivia, R. P. S. Kwok, N. Lamb, M. Hagiwara, M. R. Montminy, and R. H. Goodman, “Phosphorylated CREB binds specifically to the nuclear protein CBP,” Nature, vol. 365, no. 6449, pp. 855–859, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. R. Eckner, M. E. Ewen, D. Newsome et al., “Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the adenovirus E1A-associated 300-kD protein (p300) reveals a protein with properties of a transcriptional adaptor,” Genes and Development, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 869–884, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. C. Hansen, C. Tse, and A. P. Wolffe, “Structure and function of the core histone N-termini: more than meets the eye,” Biochemistry, vol. 37, no. 51, pp. 17637–17641, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. R. J. Gusterson, L. W. Yuan, and D. S. Latchman, “Distinct serine residues in CBP and p300 are necessary for their activation by phenylephrine,” The International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, vol. 36, no. 5, pp. 893–899, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. K. Balasubramanyam, R. A. Varier, M. Altaf et al., “Curcumin, a novel p300/CREB-binding protein-specific inhibitor of acetyltransferase, represses the acetylation of histone/nonhistone proteins and histone acetyltransferase-dependent chromatin transcription,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 279, no. 49, pp. 51163–51171, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus