Table of Contents
ISRN Molecular Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 548359, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/548359
Review Article

The Not4 RING E3 Ligase: A Relevant Player in Cotranslational Quality Control

Department of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, CMU, University of Geneva, 1 Rue Michel Servet, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland

Received 4 November 2012; Accepted 21 November 2012

Academic Editors: J. Ciesiolka, M. Greenwood, H.-C. Lee, A. Maucuer, and T. O'Connor

Copyright © 2013 Martine A. Collart. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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