Table of Contents
ISRN Psychiatry
Volume 2013, Article ID 616304, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/616304
Clinical Study

Dimensions of Hallucinations and Delusions in Affective and Nonaffective Illnesses

1Ranchi Institute of Neuro-Psychiatry and Allied Sciences, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834006, India
2Department of Psychiatry, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Rural Medical College & Hospital, District Ahmednagar, Loni, Maharashtra 413736, India

Received 31 May 2013; Accepted 14 July 2013

Academic Editors: V. Sar, S. L. Stern, and X. Torres

Copyright © 2013 Ranju Kumari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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