Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 631839, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/631839
Review Article

Long-Distance Animal Migrations in the Oceanic Environment: Orientation and Navigation Correlates

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Via A. Volta 6, 56126 Pisa, Italy

Received 11 November 2012; Accepted 21 November 2012

Academic Editors: K. Cheng, S. P. Henzi, and L. Kaczmarek

Copyright © 2013 Paolo Luschi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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