Table of Contents
ISRN Infectious Diseases
Volume 2013, Article ID 639275, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/639275
Research Article

Chemical Composition and Trypanocidal Activity of the Essential Oils from Hedychium coronarium J. Koenig (Zingiberaceae)

1Department of Biological Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Araraquara, UNESP, São Paulo State University, 14801-902 Araraquara, SP, Brazil
2Institute of Chemistry, UNESP, São Paulo State University, 14800-900 Araraquara, SP, Brazil
3Center of Pharmaceutical Studies, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal
4Department of Natural Active Principles and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Araraquara, UNESP, São Paulo State University, 14801-902 Araraquara, SP, Brazil
5UNESP, São Paulo State University, Coast Campus, 11330-900 São Vicente, SP, Brazil

Received 31 May 2013; Accepted 20 June 2013

Academic Editors: M. A. De Souza and H. Hisaeda

Copyright © 2013 Danilo Fernando Rodrigues et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The composition of the essential oils (EO) from leaves and rhizomes of Hedychium coronarium was analyzed both by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Thirty and thirty-nine compounds were identified, respectively, in the oils from leaves and rhizomes, representing 88% and 86.1% of the whole compositions. Caryophyllene oxide is the major component in rhizomes while 1,8-cineole predominates in leaves oil. Essential oils and major components were tested for trypanocidal activity using procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei (427 and 29-13 strains). The cytotoxicity index (CI50), using the MTT colorimetric method, showed that essential oils and 1,8-cineole were inactive (>100 μg·mL−1. Nevertheless, caryophyllene oxide revealed a remarkable activity against both T. brucei strains (CI50 = 65.77 μg·mL−1 and 24.53 μg·mL−1, resp.), and the synergism between caryophyllene oxide plus pentamidine (1 : 1, v/v) highly increased the trypanocidal activity (<1.0 μg·mL−1).