Table of Contents
ISRN Toxicology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 657849, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/657849
Research Article

Gastrointestinal Elimination of Perfluorinated Compounds Using Cholestyramine and Chlorella pyrenoidosa

1Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 2935-66 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6K 4C1
2Forest Hills, NY 11375, USA
3ALS Laboratory Group, University of Alberta and Environmental Division, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 5C1

Received 8 June 2013; Accepted 4 August 2013

Academic Editors: Y. C. Hseu and T. E. Stoker

Copyright © 2013 Stephen J. Genuis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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