Table of Contents
ISRN Environmental Chemistry
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 684297, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/684297
Research Article

Closed Anaerobic Biotransformation Products of Organoarsenic Compounds in Fucus distichus

Department of Chemical Sciences, College of Sciences, Afe Babalola University, Ekiti State, Ado-Ekiti 360211, Nigeria

Received 27 April 2013; Accepted 11 June 2013

Academic Editors: N. Belzile, A. Waseem, and C. Waterlot

Copyright © 2013 Abiodun A. Ojo and Amos Onasanya. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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