Table of Contents
ISRN Otolaryngology
Volume 2013, Article ID 698575, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/698575
Clinical Study

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in Irradiated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Survivors

1Department of Otolaryngology, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 52 Meihua East Road, Xiangzhou District, Zhuhai 519020, China
2Department of Radiation Oncology, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 52 Meihua East Road, Xiangzhou District, Zhuhai 519020, China

Received 11 August 2013; Accepted 16 September 2013

Academic Editors: C. Y. Chien, R. Maire, M. Sone, and C. Suárez

Copyright © 2013 Shaoyan Feng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. It has been assumed that postirradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients are prone to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The purpose of this study was to better understand this clinical entity. Materials and Methods. From September 2003 to June 2011, we conducted a retrospective study of 11 irradiated NPC patients with BPPV in our institute. During the same period, 11 irradiated NPC patients without BPPV were randomly selected and enrolled as the control group. All medical records of these patients were evaluated. Results. The risk of BPPV rises significantly when the patient undergoes radiotherapy (RT) twice and the threshold radiation dose is >120 Gy ( ). The occurrence of postirradiated BPPV was significantly related to incidences of otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) ( and 0.009, resp.). All the patients responded well to repositioning maneuvers. Conclusion. A second course of RT, postirradiated otitis media, or SNHL is associated with the potential risk of radiation-induced BPPV. Repositioning maneuvers were safe and effective for relief of this disease.