Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 734040, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/734040
Research Article

Short-Term Memory of the Amplitude of Body Rotation in Orienting Behavior of African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis)

1Faculty of Integrated Human Studies, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
2Department of Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
3Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan

Received 11 February 2013; Accepted 28 February 2013

Academic Editors: A. Arslan, I. Krams, D. Park, and A. Robins

Copyright © 2013 Gouki Okazawa and Shintaro Funahashi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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