Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 789613, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/789613
Research Article

Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Chloroform and Methanol Extracts of Centella asiatica Linn

1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Vidya Vihar, Rai Bareli Road, Lucknow 226025, India
2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India

Received 1 July 2013; Accepted 26 September 2013

Academic Editors: R. Thurmond and T. B. Vree

Copyright © 2013 Sudipta Saha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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