Table of Contents
ISRN Parasitology
Volume 2013, Article ID 804585, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/804585
Research Article

Mucin-Related Molecular Responses of Bronchial Epithelial Cells in Rats Infected with the Nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

1Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kawaramachi-Hirokoji, Kyoto 602-8566, Japan
2Department of Medical Zoology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566, Japan

Received 26 January 2013; Accepted 18 February 2013

Academic Editors: A. Jardim, G. Mkoji, and R. Zufferey

Copyright © 2013 Koichi Soga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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