Table of Contents
ISRN Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 814690, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/814690
Review Article

Estrogen Signaling and the Aging Brain: Context-Dependent Considerations for Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy

Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, 2160 S First Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, USA

Received 12 April 2013; Accepted 21 May 2013

Academic Editors: F. Escobar-Jimenez, H. Galbo, E. Hajduch, M. Hiriart, H.-Q. Qu, and H. Ueshiba

Copyright © 2013 Natasha N. Mott and Toni R. Pak. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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