Table of Contents
ISRN Biotechnology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 820671, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/820671
Review Article

Genetically Modified Plants: Public and Scientific Perceptions

Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042, India

Received 15 January 2013; Accepted 10 February 2013

Academic Editors: W. A. Kues, J. Sereikaite, and J. J. Valdes

Copyright © 2013 Smita Rastogi Verma. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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