Table of Contents
ISRN Oxidative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 831596, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/831596
Review Article

Vasculotoxic and Proinflammatory Effects of Plasma Heme: Cell Signaling and Cytoprotective Responses

1Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, Vascular Biology Center, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Received 10 April 2013; Accepted 30 May 2013

Academic Editors: R. Fato and K. Iles

Copyright © 2013 John D. Belcher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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