Table of Contents
ISRN Neuroscience
Volume 2013, Article ID 868491, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/868491
Review Article

What Guides Visual Overt Attention under Natural Conditions? Past and Future Research

Social and Media Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Cologne, Richard-Strauss-Straße 2, 50931 Cologne, Germany

Received 31 August 2013; Accepted 30 October 2013

Academic Editors: A. H. Kihara, A. J. Nelson, J. A. Perianez, and W. Waleszczyk

Copyright © 2013 Kai Kaspar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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