Table of Contents
ISRN Anatomy
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 870721, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/870721
Research Article

Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Distribution in the Anterior Hypothalamus of the Female Rats

1Departamento de Anatomía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de La Laguna, Ofra s/n, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
2Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de La Laguna, Ofra s/n, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife, Islas Canarias, Spain
3Departamento de Biotecnología, Instituto de Investigación y Ciencias de Puerto del Rosario, c/Tenerife 35, 35600 Puerto del Rosario, Fuerteventura, Isla Canarias, Spain

Received 20 February 2013; Accepted 17 April 2013

Academic Editors: Y. Aurell and T. Nohno

Copyright © 2013 Leandro Castañeyra-Ruiz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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