Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2013, Article ID 874263, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/874263
Research Article

Antiallergic and Antiarthritic Effects of Stem Bark Extract of Glyphaea brevis (Spreng) Monachino (Tiliaceae) in Murine Models

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Received 22 July 2013; Accepted 13 August 2013

Academic Editors: P. Cos and T. W. Stone

Copyright © 2013 David D. Obiri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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