Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 892072, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/892072
Research Article

Early and Late Shift of Brain Laterality in STG, HG, and Cerebellum with Normal Aging during a Short-Term Memory Task

1Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy Program, School of Diagnostic Science and Applied Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2Department of Psychology and fMRIotago, University of Otago, William James Building, 275 Leith Walk, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand
3Audiology Program, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 9 December 2012; Accepted 10 January 2013

Academic Editors: T. Hori, P. G. Simos, and E. M. Wassermann

Copyright © 2013 Hanani Abdul Manan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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