Table of Contents
ISRN Developmental Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 920265, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/920265
Research Article

Changes in -Tubulin Protein Distribution in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Oocytes and the Early Cleavage-Stage Embryo

1Department of Biology, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA
2Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee-Memphis, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
3Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Memphis, 223 Life Science Building, Memphis, TN 38152-3560, USA

Received 1 October 2012; Accepted 23 October 2012

Academic Editors: O. Bossinger and M. Lardelli

Copyright © 2013 Jianxiong Liu and Charles A. Lessman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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