Table of Contents
ISRN Inorganic Chemistry
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 971764, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/971764
Research Article

Investigation into Structural Changes of the Copper Binding Site in Lysyl Oxidase upon Substrate and Inhibitor Docking

Department of Chemistry and Physics, Emmanuel College, 400 Fenway, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 28 May 2013; Accepted 19 June 2013

Academic Editors: F. G. Doro, C. L. Liu, and Z. Xiao

Copyright © 2013 M. Lynch and F. Ryvkin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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