Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 212874, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/212874
Review Article

Birth Defects Surveillance in the United States: Challenges and Implications of International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification Implementation

1Environmental Sciences and Health Graduate Program, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA
2School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA

Received 28 July 2014; Accepted 21 September 2014; Published 29 October 2014

Academic Editor: Karel Allegaert

Copyright © 2014 Adel Mburia-Mwalili and Wei Yang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. D. L. Hoyert and J. Q. Xu, “Deaths: preliminary data for 2011,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 40–42, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Update on overall prevalence of major birth defects—Atlanta, Georgia, 1978–2005,” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 1–15, 1978. View at Google Scholar
  3. World Health Organization, “Congenital anomalies,” Fact Sheet 370, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014, http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs370/en/. View at Google Scholar
  4. C. P. Howson and B. Modell, March of Dimes Global Report on Birth Defects: The Hidden Toll of Dying and Disabled Children, March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, NY, USA, 2006.
  5. C. A. Russo and A. Elixhauser, Hospitalizations for Birth Defects, 2004: Statistical Brief 24. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Statistical Briefs, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (US), Rockville, Md, USA, 2007.
  6. T. van der Bom, A. C. Zomer, A. H. Zwinderman, F. J. Meijboom, B. J. Bouma, and B. J. Mulder, “The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease,” Nature Reviews Cardiology, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 50–60, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. D. Reller, M. J. Strickland, T. Riehle-Colarusso, W. T. Mahle, and A. Correa, “Prevalence of congenital heart defects in metropolitan Atlanta, 1998–2005,” Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 153, no. 6, pp. 807–813, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. K. J. Jenkins, A. Correa, J. A. Feinstein et al., “Noninherited risk factors and congenital cardiovascular defects: Current knowledge—a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young,” Circulation, vol. 115, no. 23, pp. 2995–3014, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. W. N. Nembhard, T. Wang, M. L. Loscalzo, and J. L. Salemi, “Variation in the prevalence of congenital heart defects by maternal race/ethnicity and infant sex,” Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 156, no. 2, pp. 259–264, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. B. Gelb, M. Brueckner, W. Chung et al., “The congenital heart disease genetic network study: rationale, design, and early results,” Circulation Research, vol. 112, no. 4, pp. 698–706, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. P. W. Yoon, S. A. Rasmussen, M. C. Lynberg et al., “The national birth defects prevention study,” Public Health Reports, vol. 116, supplement 1, pp. 32–40, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. C. A. Hobbs, S. E. Hopkins, and C. J. Simmons, “Sources of variability in birth defects prevalence rates,” Teratology, vol. 64, supplement 1, pp. S8–S13, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. International Epidemiological Association, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 5th edition, 2008.
  14. L. D. Edmonds, “Birth defect surveillance at the state and local level,” Teratology, vol. 56, no. 1-2, pp. 5–9, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  15. A. Correa-Villaseñor, J. Cragan, J. Kucik, L. O’Leary, C. Siffel, and L. Williams, “The metropolitan atlanta congenital defects program: 35 years of birth defects surveillance at the centers for disease control and prevention,” Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology, vol. 67, no. 9, pp. 617–624, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. C. T. Mai, J. E. Kucik, J. Isenburg et al., “Selected birth defects data from population-based birth defects surveillance programs in the United States, 2006 to 2010: featuring trisomy conditions,” Birth Defects Research A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology, vol. 97, no. 11, pp. 709–725, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. L. E. Sever, Ed., Guidelines for Conducting Birth Defects Surveillance, National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN), Atlanta, Ga, USA, 2004, http://www.nbdpn.org/docs/NBDPN_Guidelines2012.pdf.
  18. R. S. Kirby and M. L. Browne, “Birth defects surveillance: Epidemiology, health services research, public health, and prevention,” Birth Defects Research Part A—Clinical and Molecular Teratology, vol. 97, no. 10, pp. 617–618, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research, “About Us,” 2014, http://www.icbdsr.org/page.asp?n=AboutUs.
  20. International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research, “Programme descriptions,” 2014, http://www.icbdsr.org/page.asp?p=12919&l=1.
  21. P. Nsubuga, M. E. White, S. B. Thacker et al., “Public health surveillance: a tool for targeting and monitoring interventions,” in Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries, vol. 53, chapter 53, World Bank, Washington, DC, USA, 2nd edition, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  22. J. L. Salemi, J. P. Tanner, S. Kennedy et al., “A comparison of two surveillance strategies for selected birth defects in Florida,” Public Health Reports, vol. 127, no. 4, pp. 391–400, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. World Health Organization/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research, Birth Defects Surveillance: A Manual for Programme Managers, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014, http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/110223/1/9789241548724_eng.pdf?ua=1.
  24. C. T. Mai, “Back to the basics and current practice of population-based birth defects surveillance in the United States,” in Proceedings of the National Birth Defects Prevention Network Virtual Meeting—Session 2 (NBDPN’14), March 2014.
  25. B. K. Frohnert, R. C. Lussky, M. A. Alms, N. J. Mendelsohn, D. M. Symonik, and M. C. Falken, “Validity of hospital discharge data for identifying infants with cardiac defects,” Journal of Perinatology, vol. 25, no. 11, pp. 737–742, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. M. K. Ethen and M. A. Canfield, “Impact of including elective pregnancy terminations before 20 weeks gestation on birth defect rates,” Teratology, vol. 66, supplement 1, pp. S32–S35, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. J. M. Jackson, K. S. Crider, J. D. Cragan, S. A. Rasmussen, and R. S. Olney, “Frequency of prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis and pregnancy outcomes by maternal race-ethnicity, and the effect on the prevalence of trisomy 21, Metropolitan Atlanta, 1996–2005,” The American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, vol. 164, no. 1, pp. 70–76, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. K. S. Crider, R. S. Olney, and J. D. Cragan, “Trisomies 13 and 18: population prevalences, characteristics, and prenatal diagnosis, metropolitan Atlanta, 1994–2003,” American Journal of Medical Genetics A, vol. 146, no. 7, pp. 820–826, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. J. D. Cragan and S. M. Gilboa, “Including prenatal diagnoses in birth defects monitoring: experience of the metropolitan atlanta congenital defects program,” Birth Defects Research Part A—Clinical and Molecular Teratology, vol. 85, no. 1, pp. 20–29, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. World Health Organization, International Classification of Diseases (ICD) Information Sheet, 2014, http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/factsheet/en/.
  31. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Classification of Diseases, Functioning, and Disability, International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10cm.htm.
  32. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM)-FY 2015 Release of ICD-10-CM, 2014, ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Publications/ICD10CM/2015/.
  33. T. Bedard, R. B. Lowry, and B. Sibbald, “ICD-10 coding for congenital anomalies: a Canadian experience.,” Journal of registry management, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 4–7, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. J. Moczygemba and S. H. Fenton, “Lessons learned from an ICD-10-CM clinical documentation pilot study,” Perspectives in Health Information Management, vol. 9, p. 1c, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  35. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, International Classification of Diseases-9-CM, (1979), 2007, http://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/sci_data/codes/icd9/type_txt/icd9cm.asp.
  36. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Classification of Diseases, Functioning, and Disability, International Classification of Diseases, (ICD-10-CM/PCS) Transition, 2013, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10cm_pcs_background.htm.
  37. Texas Department of State Health Services, “Texas birth defects epidemiology & surveillance: six-digit codes for reportable birth defects,” 2007, https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/birthdefects/data/7_1_Six_Digit_Codes_For_Reportable_Birth_Defects.doc.
  38. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Birth Defects: State-Based Tracking System, 2014, http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/states/.
  39. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: BRFSS Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), 2014, http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/about/brfss_faq.htm.
  40. National Birth Defects Prevention Network, Annual Reports, 2014, http://www.nbdpn.org/annual_reports.php.
  41. National Birth Defects Prevention Network, ICD-10-CM and Birth Defects Surveillance: Code Translation from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM, 2013, http://www.nbdpn.org/icd9_icd10_code_translation.php.