Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 235619, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/235619
Review Article

Emerging Roles of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Supplementation in Human Diseases

1Graduate Program in Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2
2Graduate Program in Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3E 0J9

Received 28 July 2014; Revised 25 September 2014; Accepted 17 October 2014; Published 12 November 2014

Academic Editor: Giuseppe D'Antona

Copyright © 2014 Nahid Tamanna and Niaz Mahmood. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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