Table of Contents
ISRN Forestry
Volume 2014, Article ID 240510, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/240510
Research Article

Vegetation Response to Climate Change and Human Impacts in the Usambara Mountains

1Environment Department, York Institute for Ecosystem Dynamics (KITE), University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, UK
2Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI), P.O. Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania
3Department of Archaeology, University of York, King's Manor, York YO 17 EP, UK

Received 4 December 2013; Accepted 18 February 2014; Published 29 May 2014

Academic Editors: S. Davey, J. F. Mas, and M. Vitale

Copyright © 2014 C. T. Mumbi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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