Table of Contents
ISRN Obesity
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 312826, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/312826
Research Article

Appetite Sensations, Appetite Signaling Proteins, and Glucose in Obese Adolescents with Subclinical Binge Eating Disorder

1Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1
2School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5
3Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5
4Division of Endocrinology, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1
5School of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5

Received 19 December 2013; Accepted 5 February 2014; Published 11 March 2014

Academic Editors: A. Erkner, D. Micic, and C. Schmidt

Copyright © 2014 Kristi B. Adamo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. This study aimed to investigate potential differences in appetite sensations, ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucose and their relationship with energy and macronutrient intake in obese adolescents with subclinical binge eating disorder. Methods. Fifteen obese adolescents (six and nine individuals with and without subclinical binge eating disorder, resp.) qualified for this study. Visual analog scales and Three-Factor Eating Questionnaires were used to assess eating behaviours. Circulating ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucose were measured after fasting and at multiple time points postprandially following a standardized breakfast meal. Energy and macronutrient intake were measured with an ad libitum lunch buffet. Results. Emotional eating scores were significantly higher in obese adolescents with subclinical binge eating disorder. Hunger levels rose and satiety levels fell significantly over the course of the monitoring period but there was no difference between the two groups. Obese adolescents with subclinical binge eating disorder did not have significantly different levels of appetite signaling proteins or glucose. Obese adolescents with subclinical binge eating disorder had a nonsignificantly higher energy and macronutrient intake. Conclusions. A significant difference between the two groups in terms of their emotional eating scores highlights the important role that psychological factors play in relation to eating behaviours.