Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014, Article ID 323626, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/323626
Research Article

Impact of Site Disturbances from Harvesting and Logging on Soil Physical Properties and Pinus kesiya Tree Growth

Malawi College of Forestry and Wildlife, Private Bag 6, Dedza, Malawi

Received 3 March 2014; Revised 13 May 2014; Accepted 21 May 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Silvia Imhoff

Copyright © 2014 Edward Missanjo and Gift Kamanga-Thole. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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