Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2014, Article ID 324063, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/324063
Research Article

Antidepressant Effects of Mallotus oppositifolius in Acute Murine Models

1Department of Pharmacology, University of Ghana Medical School, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana
2Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
3Department of Biomedical and Forensic Sciences, School of Biological Science, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana

Received 25 November 2013; Accepted 18 December 2013; Published 12 March 2014

Academic Editors: P. S. D'Aquila, A. Fernandez-Guasti, and S. Mingmalairak

Copyright © 2014 Kennedy K. E. Kukuia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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