Table of Contents
ISRN Polymer Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 361069, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/361069
Research Article

Characterization of Some Spelt Wheat Starches as a Renewable Biopolymeric Material

1Department of Analysis and Evaluation of Food Quality, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow, Poland
2Department of Engineering and Machinery for Food Industry, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow, Poland
3Department of Carbohydrate Technology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow, Poland

Received 31 October 2013; Accepted 19 December 2013; Published 5 February 2014

Academic Editors: A. Buzarovska, T. R. Chantara, and A. Uygun

Copyright © 2014 Dorota Gałkowska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this work was to analyze selected physical, chemical, thermal, and rheological properties of starches isolated from different spelt wheat varieties. The analyzed starches contained from 22.5 to 24.6 g/100 g of amylose and from 45.9 to 50.6 mg/100 g of phosphorus. Ranges of characteristic gelatinization temperatures, , , and , were 55.7–58.5°C, 61.1–62.6°C, and 67.4–68.2°C, respectively, while gelatinization enthalpy ranged from 8.87 to 9.96 J/g. The pasting curves showed significant differences in pasting characteristics of the starches. The values of maximum viscosity ( ) and viscosity after cooling ( ) determined for the starch pastes were in the range of 82.3–100.7 B.U. and 149.3–172.7 B.U., respectively. The starch pastes demonstrated non-Newtonian, shear thinning flow behaviour and thixotropy phenomenon. After cooling the resulting starch gels were characterized by different viscoelastic properties, with a dominance of elastic features ( ). The starches exhibited different tendency to retrogradation, with its degree ( ) in the range of 21.1–37.4%.