Table of Contents
ISRN Education
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 361685, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/361685
Review Article

Inquiry-Based Education for Students with Visual Impairment

College of Education and Human Development, The University of Maine, 5766 Shibles Hall, Room 303, Orono, ME 04469-5766, USA

Received 17 November 2013; Accepted 23 January 2014; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editors: K. Capps, K. Kingsley, K. Y. Kuo, and L. Roecker

Copyright © 2014 Deborah L. Rooks-Ellis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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