Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014, Article ID 368149, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/368149
Research Article

A GPU-Based Gibbs Sampler for a Unidimensional IRT Model

1Educational Measurement and Statistics, Department of Educational Psychology & Special Education, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA
2Department of Computer Science, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA

Received 24 April 2014; Revised 11 July 2014; Accepted 21 July 2014; Published 30 October 2014

Academic Editor: Jussi Tohka

Copyright © 2014 Yanyan Sheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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