Table of Contents
ISRN Otolaryngology
Volume 2014, Article ID 374035, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/374035
Research Article

Association of Auditory Steady State Responses with Perception of Temporal Modulations and Speech in Noise

1AWH Special College, Payyanakkal, Kozhikode, Kerala 673 003, India
2Department of Speech & Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka 576 104, India
3Department of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Mangalore, Karnataka 575 001, India

Received 19 January 2014; Accepted 4 March 2014; Published 14 April 2014

Academic Editors: C. Y. Chien, K. Parham, M. Suzuki, and S. C. Winter

Copyright © 2014 Venugopal Manju et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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