Table of Contents
ISRN Nutrition
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 514026, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/514026
Review Article

Increasing Prevalence, Changes in Diagnostic Criteria, and Nutritional Risk Factors for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870311, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA

Received 27 October 2013; Accepted 9 December 2013; Published 13 February 2014

Academic Editors: D. Sullivan and S. van Hemert

Copyright © 2014 Yasmin H. Neggers. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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