Table of Contents
ISRN Immunology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 524081, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/524081
Review Article

Molecular and Cellular Pathways of Immunoglobulin G Activity In Vivo

Institute of Genetics, Department of Biology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erwin-Rommelstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen, Germany

Received 4 December 2013; Accepted 20 January 2014; Published 5 March 2014

Academic Editors: A. Bensussan and R. Merino

Copyright © 2014 Falk Nimmerjahn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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