Table of Contents
ISRN Civil Engineering
Volume 2014, Article ID 543090, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/543090
Research Article

Investigation of the Potential for Evaluation of Concrete Flaws Using Nondestructive Testing Methods

1Civil Engineering Department, The Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 9500 Bento Gonçalves Avenue, Building 43436, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2The Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 9500 Bento Gonçalves Avenue, Building 43436, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Civil Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 99 Osvaldo Aranha Avenue, 91035-190 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 9 September 2013; Accepted 12 November 2013; Published 11 May 2014

Academic Editors: X. Li and H. A. Mang

Copyright © 2014 Alexandre Lorenzi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Adoption of periodic or continuous monitoring strategies to assess condition state of infrastructure elements is a vital part of service life management (SLM). NDT methods are increasingly seen as an attractive and viable strategy to support condition monitoring. Over the last 15 years, the LEME research group at UFRGS has investigated several aspects related to the use of the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) method and its potential for real field applications. One of the main advances involved the development of artificial neural network (ANN) models for correlating compressive strength and UPV measurements. Another examined problem was how to deal with the large amount of raw data derived from inspection of large structures. Several studies were carried out to check different mapping techniques, as reported by Lorenzi et al. 2011. This paper relates one investigation where UPV and rebound hammer (RH) measurements were collected from a beam containing several induced defects, simulated using different materials. The results were processed using a mapping strategy, which indicated suspicious points where core extraction was undertaken. All cores taken from points derived from UPV results were found to have flaws providing evidence that this may be a suitable tool to assess concrete structures, when data is properly interpreted.