Table of Contents
ISRN Pathology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 640829, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/640829
Review Article

Do Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells (Treg Cells) Play a Role in the Immunopathogenesis of Primary/Idiopathic Minimal Change Disease?

1Tregs and HLA Research Force and Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital, The Academia, 20 College Road, Singapore 169856
2Renal Medicine Department, Singapore General Hospital, The Academia, 20 College Road, Singapore 169856
3Tregs and HLA Research Force and Renal Medicine Department, Singapore General Hospital, The Academia, Level 3, 20 College Road, Singapore 169856
4Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital, The Academia, 20 College Road, Singapore 169856

Received 26 September 2013; Accepted 6 January 2014; Published 19 February 2014

Academic Editors: K. Honda, A. Satoskar, M. Schaller, and M. Urushihara

Copyright © 2014 Susan Swee-Shan Hue et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Minimal change disease constitutes a major cause of nephrotic syndrome. It is regarded as a non-immune-complex mediated primary glomerulopathy and pathogenetically is characterised by podocyte injury and effacement of foot processes; therefore, it is also classified as a type of podocytopathy. T cell dysfunction with increased levels of a soluble glomerular permeability factor has been proposed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of minimal change disease. It has been therefore suggested that a dysfunction of regulatory T cells, the orchestrators of immune homeostasis, could be implicated in perpetuating T cell activation in this condition. However, the actual contribution of regulatory T cell dysfunction in the immunopathogenesis of primary minimal change disease is still largely unclear. We here propose a theoretical model based on the available evidence.