Table of Contents
ISRN Neuroscience
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 756952, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/756952
Research Article

A Recurrent Increase of Synchronization in the EEG Continues from Waking throughout NREM and REM Sleep

1Klinik für Neurologie, Pfalzklinikum für Neurologie und Psychiatrie, Weinstraße 100, 76889 Klingenmünster, Germany
2Marienkrankenhaus St. Wendel, Stroke Unit, 66606 St. Wendel, Germany
3Klinik für Neurologie, Westpfalz Klinikum GmbH, Hellmut-Hartert-Straße 1, 67655 Kaiserslautern, Germany

Received 30 October 2013; Accepted 19 December 2013; Published 6 February 2014

Academic Editors: S. Bagnato and C. Kellinghaus

Copyright © 2014 Ralf Landwehr et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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