Table of Contents
ISRN Hematology
Volume 2014, Article ID 764754, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/764754
Research Article

Preventative Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenyl Ester on Cadmium Intoxication Induced Hematological and Blood Coagulation Disturbances and Hepatorenal Damage in Rats

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Umm Al-Qura University, P.O. Box 7607, 7152 Makkah, Saudi Arabia

Received 12 February 2014; Accepted 17 March 2014; Published 30 March 2014

Academic Editors: D. Del Principe, J. A. Rosado, and B. Wachowicz

Copyright © 2014 Tariq Helal Ashour. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. Akyol, G. Ozturk, Z. Ginis, F. Armutcu, M. R. Yigitoglu, and O. Akyol, “In vivo and in vitro antıneoplastic actions of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE): therapeutic perspectives,” Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 65, no. 4, pp. 515–526, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. A. A. Korish, “Effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on the hemostatic alterations associated with toxic-induced acute liver failure,” Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 158–163, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. M. Khan, C. Elango, M. A. Ansari, I. Singh, and A. K. Singh, “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester reduces neurovascular inflammation and protects rat brain following transient focal cerebral ischemia,” Journal of Neurochemistry, vol. 102, no. 2, pp. 365–377, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. Y.-J. Chen, A.-C. Huang, H.-H. Chang et al., “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an antioxidant from propolis, protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells of competitive cyclists against hyperthermal stress,” Journal of Food Science, vol. 74, no. 6, pp. H162–H167, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. O. Gokalp, E. Uz, E. Cicek et al., “Ameliorating role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against isoniazid-induced oxidative damage in red blood cells,” Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 290, no. 1-2, pp. 55–59, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. L. H. Boudreau, J. Maillet, L. M. LeBlanc et al., “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester and its amide analogue are potent inhibitors of leukotriene biosynthesis in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 2, Article ID e31833, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. E. H. Jihen, M. Imed, H. Fatima, and K. Abdelhamid, “Protective effects of selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) on cadmium (Cd) toxicity in the liver of the rat: effects on the oxidative stress,” Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 72, no. 5, pp. 1559–1564, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. P. Gong, F. Chen, X. Liu, X. Gong, J. Wang, and Y. Ma, “Protective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester against cadmium-induced renal damage in mice,” Journal of Toxicological Sciences, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 415–425, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. R. Hambach, D. Lison, P. C. D'Haese et al., “Co-exposure to lead increases the renal response to low levels of cadmium in metallurgy workers,” Toxicology Letters, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 233–238, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. U. S. Department of Health Services, “Toxicological profile for cadmium,” Draft for Public Comment, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, Ga, USA, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  11. C. Simpkins, T. Lloyd, S. Li, and S. Balderman, “Metallothionein-induced increase in mitochondrial inner membrane permeability,” Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 30–34, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. M. M. Kostić, B. Ognjanović, R. V. Zikić et al., “Cadmium-induced changes of antioxidant and metabolic status in red blood cells of rats: in vivo effects,” European Journal of Haematology, vol. 51, pp. 86–92, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  13. M. Kanter, O. Coskun, and A. Gurel, “Effect of black cumin (Nigella sativa) on cadmium-induced oxidative stress in the blood of rats,” Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 107, no. 3, pp. 277–287, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. W. Fariss, “Cadmium toxicity: unique cytoprotective properties of alpha tocopheryl succinate in hepatocytes,” Toxicology, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 63–77, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. H. Mollaoglu, A. Gokcimen, F. Ozguner et al., “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester prevents cadmium-induced cardiac impairment in rat,” Toxicology, vol. 227, no. 1-2, pp. 15–20, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. F. Chen and P. Gong, “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects mice hepatic damage against cadmium exposure,” Procedia Environmental Sciences, vol. 8, pp. 633–636, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. A. Kobroob, N. Chattipakorn, and O. Wongmekiat, “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester ameliorates cadmium-induced kidney mitochondrial injury,” Chemico-Biological Interactions, vol. 200, no. 1, pp. 21–27, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. C. Lemini, R. Jaimez, and Y. Franco, “Gender and inter-species influence on coagulation tests of rats and mice,” Thrombosis Research, vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 415–419, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. A. Akesson, “Cadmium exposure in the environment: renal effects and the benchmark dose,” in Encyclopedia of Environmental Health, O. N. Jerome, Ed., pp. 465–473, Elsevier, Burlington, Canada, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  20. G. Yuan, S. Dai, Z. Yin et al., “Toxicological assessment of combined lead and cadmium: acute and sub-chronic toxicity study in rats,” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 65, pp. 260–268, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  21. J. W. Bauman, J. Liu, and C. D. Klaassen, “Production of metallothionein and heat-shock proteins in response to metals,” Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 15–22, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. V. B. Liju, K. Jeena, and R. Kuttan, “Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as mutagenic evaluation of essential oil from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.),” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 53, pp. 52–61, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. T. S. Gill and A. Epple, “Stress-related changes in the hematological profile of the American Eel (Anguilla rostrata),” Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 227–235, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. B. I. Ognjanović, S. Z. Pavlović, S. D. Maletić et al., “Protective influence of vitamin E on antioxidant defense system in the blood rats treated with cadmium,” Physiological Research, vol. 52, pp. 563–570, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  25. L. Amitrano, M. A. Guardascione, V. Brancaccio, and A. Balzano, “Coagulation disorders in liver disease,” Seminars in Liver Disease, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 83–96, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. Y. Yildiz, M. Serter, R. O. Ek et al., “Protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury,” Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 738–744, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus